Johnny Depp made honorary member of Comanche nation

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Natalie 9
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Re: Johnny Depp made honorary member of Comanche nation

Post by Natalie 9 » Tue Jun 19, 2012 1:37 am

Sci-Fi Girl wrote:Johnny Depp Meets Navajo Leaders as Tonto
Are you sure, it really Johnny Depp in these photos? :shock: He isn't similar to himself. Or it is a lot of cosmetics, even the nose is much more.

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Sci-Fi Girl
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Re: Johnny Depp made honorary member of Comanche nation

Post by Sci-Fi Girl » Tue Jun 19, 2012 8:12 am

Natalie 9 wrote:Sci-Fi Girl, thank you for very interesting detailed explanation. I never saw films about 'The Lone Ranger' therefore a lot of things from this wasn't known to me.

I got my conception of Native Americans in the childhood from books of Mayne Reid, Fenimore Cooper, Jack London, and from German films with Goyko Mitich's participation.

Gojko Mitich not only isn't the Native American, but even was born absolutely in other part of the world - he is Serbian. But his magnificent acting convinced the audience what exactly the real Indian should be such. His portrayal not only isn't insulting, but even too heroic. Though the majority of these roles - supporting roles, he looks even more romantically, than the protagonist. I don't know, how correctly he portrayed the Native American, but he portrayed very beautifully. :love2:

In general at the time of my childhood in Russia Native Americans were very romaticized. Children became engrossed in reading of novels about Indians, played Indians, drew Indians. I remember, we drew strip soot on the faces, stuck feathers in hair, made bows of branches. We gave names of mustangs to the bicycles and rushed by country roads with wild shouts "Hau, hau!". :lol: We climbed into "a wood thicket" (which usually was in a forest belt about the near highway or in bushes of city park) and built there shelters of branches. We hunted imagined deer and bisons, and then fried on a campfire the sausages taken from home. :lol: :dreamy: I grew, but I still has peculiar fond attitude to these folk.
Natalie and Nonny, those are wonderful stories! Thank you for sharing them! 8)



Obviously, not all film portrayals are stereotyped or offensive. It's just that enough of them have been in the past, that many people are still sensitive about it, or at least wary, and understandably so.

On an interesting side note, Leonard Nimoy played a number of Native Americans in the 60's, in guest roles on various TV shows. It was right in the middle of the time when they wouldn't bother to hire real Native Americans, and the writing was probably stereotyped, but I'm sure he did his best with what he was given. :lol: (I haven't seen any of them.)

SFG

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Sci-Fi Girl
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Re: Johnny Depp made honorary member of Comanche nation

Post by Sci-Fi Girl » Thu Jun 21, 2012 6:43 am

I have stories too. :D

When I was very little, my mother took me to something called "The American Indian Cross-cultural Foundation", where we heard many different native storytellers.

I believe that when you learn a culture's traditional stories, you learn more about them as a people than if you just learn what they wear, or what they eat. A culture's oral tradition is how the beliefs and values of a people were passed down through the generations. It is one of the most valuable things to keep alive.



Then, I spent all my teen summers at a wilderness school summer camp. It was not simply survival skills, but primitive living skills. How to live well in the woods, and make what you need, using only what can be found in nature. How to live in harmony and symbiosis with the earth. We learned the skills of many different native peoples and traditions. Most of it was second or third hand however, as we didn't have native instructors.

But one year, we had the the most amazing guest instructor: an Australian Aboriginal tribal dancer! :D He taught us to make boomerangs, and didgeridoos, but the dancing! Every night the dancing!!! :mrgreen:

It was amazing. We were in awe of him! But at the same time, he told the director of the school that he was amazed and thrilled to be working with young people who actually wanted to learn what he had to share. The children of his people wanted nothing to do with the old ways. He would try to teach them anyway, but they really weren't interested. He was so happy that we were so eager to learn it all! And we loved it!

Also, he was just as fascinated by the things that we had to share with him. He would ask us about our native wildlife, and we would tell him about our local birds and plants. He was just as fascinated by our familiar wildlife, as we were by his stories of wallabies, goannas, and wombats! :)

We got such a big kick out of the fact that someone we were so in awe of, actually wanted to learn something from us kids! :) It was such a huge honor to learn from him, so it was almost as if we could return the favor if we could teach him something too.


A few years later, I learned to make a traditional cedar flute, from a Montagnais flute maker, who learned from an Ojibway elder. :) 8)

SFG :heart:

Nonny
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Re: Johnny Depp made honorary member of Comanche nation

Post by Nonny » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:56 pm

Sci-Fi Girl wrote:I have stories too. :D
More please! :)
We got such a big kick out of the fact that someone we were so in awe of, actually wanted to learn something from us kids! :) It was such a huge honor to learn from him, so it was almost as if we could return the favor if we could teach him something too.
The best! What an excellent experience. 8)
Emma Glitch's Reason to Live http://emmaglitch.com/

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