Keith’s Arc: An interview and Picture 2006-08-01

Discussion about all the stuff Keith has worked on,
along with what he will work on in the future

Moderators: D.Rabbit, Ashanti, Karin, mancheeks64

User avatar
D.Rabbit
Posts: 1896
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:57 pm
Contact:

Keith’s Arc: An interview and Picture 2006-08-01

Post by D.Rabbit » Mon Aug 21, 2006 8:34 pm

Thanks to a tip from Kaylar, I have this new interview for us to discuss.
From Windy City Media Group

Why it took so long to dig it up is anyone's guess, but here you go, word for word so that if the page goes 404, we still have it.
Keith’s Arc: Popular Actor Guest-Stars on Gay Series
by Andrew Davis
2006-08-01
Image
The show Noah’s Arc, seen on LOGO, already has several things going for it, including an almost embarrassingly good-looking cast and intriguing plot twists. However, the series ( which is starting its second season on Aug. 9 ) now has an increase in star wattage in the form of Keith Hamilton Cobb, who is probably best known for his roles as Tyr Anasazi on the sci-fi series Andromeda and as Noah Keefer on the daytime serial All My Children.

Cobb took a few moments to talk with Identity about several issues, including his role on Noah’s Arc and maintaining integrity.


Identity: Tell me about your character on Noah’s Arc.

Keith Hamilton Cobb: I can tell you about the character but I’ve been sworn to secrecy about plot lines and things like that.

The character’s name is Quincy Abraham and he is a very aggressive gay-rights activist and political pundit. He’s the go-to guy on Black gay issues. He has a television presence and writes a blog; he’s a celebrity within the community.

I: Can you at least tell me how long your character will be on the show?

KHC: Well, I can tell you that he has a presence for this coming season; beyond that, no one knows. They make shows from season to season. They make their order and then sit and see if they’ll be making another 8 to 10 shows.

I: What attracted you to this role?

KHC: The first [ reason ] involved Patrick-Ian Polk, the executive producer, whom I’ve known in the Hollywood community for many years. He was working on the film Punks and he gave me the script. I said that “Patrick, I wouldn’t expect you to deal with anything but gay issues, but this is so big and so broad [ that ] I would not know how to play this.” I didn’t think that the script allowed for a lot of subtlety in gay relationships. He understood and found someone else to play it ( Rockmund Dunbar ) . When I saw the finished product two or three years later, I said, “Patrick, I would’ve made this movie.” [ Laughs. ] He said, “You’re an actor. You know how things grow and develop.”

Then, he said that he was making a TV show—but everyone in Hollywood says that he’s making a TV show. [ Laughs. ] I said OK. Two and a half months ago, I got a call to audition for this show—and I saw his name attached. I went to see him and, needless to say, I was happy for him and proud of him. I asked, “Why didn’t you call and offer me this role?” He [ mentioned Punks ] and I said, “I know better now, Patrick. [ Punks ] wasn’t the right project for me at that time. But one, it’s you; two, you’re [ now ] in Vancouver; and, three, I know a little bit about the cast.”

I’m always looking for a challenge. If it’s written well and it’s a great role, it’s a great thing to stretch with.

I: I imagine that this role is a unique challenge. You’ve done everything from Shakespeare to sci-fi to soap operas, but nothing quite like this.

KHC: I’ve tackled nothing like this at all, honestly. Some people might say it’s a challenge because it’s a gay role, but I find that once I’m in it, it wasn’t a challenge for reasons one would’ve thought. The fact of the matter is that I don’t find sexual attraction, whether its male-male or male-female, to be any different. I can play that on a deeply emotional level or on a lust-driven level. I had the pleasure of working with Darryl Stephens, the lead, on this—who is quite good and quite easy to be attracted to.

I: So, regarding relationships, the biology may be different but the chemistry is the same.

KHC: Yes. Absolutely.

I: Some feel that the Black community is pretty conservative about homosexuality. Did that factor into your decision to accept this role?

KHC: No. How things resonate within me is really the determining factor in making choices. Once you start [ letting external factors in ] , you’ve lost all control and integrity over the choices you make. Yes, the community has been slow to come along with that, for various reasons—sociologically speaking. However, no matter what you do, someone will [ question ] your choices. You have to go with what’s right with you.

I: I also understand that photography is one of your hobbies. Do you remember the first picture you ever took?

KHC: No...I don’t. I can look around my house, though, and see reproductions of the first picture I ever liked. I knew that I was exhibiting a talent, but I am by no means a professional photographer. If it shows up, that’s a pleasant surprise.

There was a photo on my Web site [ that is currently down ] of a Black actor who was backstage on King’s Road in West Hollywood. He was looking at himself in the mirror in a tiny room with one bulb over his head. I call the picture Shakespeare in Fable. [ The actor had a minor role in a production of Hamlet. ]

I: I read that you consider your parents to be your biggest inspiration.

KHC: Yeah, life-wise. I look at how they’ve conducted their lives and the choices they’ve made.

We carry from generation to generation a certain consciousness that is passed on through family. We discover that there are bigger forces at work and that there’s some divinity at work.

Beyond that, on the plane of the particular, there are always influences. I have several acting influences and [ even ] influences regarding people who you watch to see how they live their lives. But, yes, my parents have this intelligence and work ethic are very important. I mean, anything that shapes us is important, right?

I: This is true—even if it’s negative.

KHC: Regardless. It gives you a point of reference, even if it tells you what you don’t want to be.

I: What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned being there in Hollywood?

KHC: I have learned to know and trust myself.

This place is about creating fantasy for money. There is a business that is not interested—and I speak as if business could have a heart and a soul—in what or who you are. It’s all about money. However, that’s not what we actors do; it does not nurture my spirit and it does not honor God. I continue to learn that I have a truth with respect to who and what I am as well as what I represent on this planet.

Even once you have the job, a director may say, “Could you be more like this?” It’s your job to find a way to be amenable to other creative forces but you also need to say, “I don’t feel that. I think what I’m bringing is what’s right”—and, more often than not, the audience will re-affirm that.

A character like Quincy is subordinate to a much larger plot; by its very nature, guest characters are there to support the larger stories and the drama of others. However, even in the small moments, making choices about how one talks to another over a dinner table, for example, [ involves ] trust about oneself and about what one is emanating.
Unconditional Love is all you need.
Image

Osiris Under Glass

User avatar
Karin
Posts: 271
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 5:14 pm
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Contact:

Post by Karin » Mon Aug 21, 2006 8:55 pm

Thanks D & Kaylar. I'll have to read it more closely when I've got more time. Just quickly reading it - interesting!

User avatar
Lea
Posts: 357
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 7:58 pm
Location: Estonia

Post by Lea » Tue Aug 22, 2006 1:17 pm

It's a very good interview!

Thanks for finding and posting it!

User avatar
D.Rabbit
Posts: 1896
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:57 pm
Contact:

Post by D.Rabbit » Tue Aug 22, 2006 4:10 pm

I: Some feel that the Black community is pretty conservative about homosexuality. Did that factor into your decision to accept this role?

KHC: No. How things resonate within me is really the determining factor in making choices. Once you start [ letting external factors in ] , you’ve lost all control and integrity over the choices you make. Yes, the community has been slow to come along with that, for various reasons—sociologically speaking. However, no matter what you do, someone will [ question ] your choices. You have to go with what’s right with you.
I suspect Keith is not only speaking of the black community, but of his fan community as well.
There where a lot of mixed reactions when Keith made the choice to take the roll of Quincy.

I for one was not all that pleased, but I had no idea what the premise of the show was, or what the character profile was.

Since most of the reasons have come to light, I'm good with his choice of work, and proud of him too.
I should have rationalized at the start, that he would not take a job where he was just a piece of fluff to be bounced from bed to bed. (All my silliness in the Noah's Arc thread was just my having him on BTW.)

I think that as we view the character exploration of Quincy, we, those who questioned his choice, will find that Keith did the right thing by addressing the problems and dilemmas that effect the AA homosexual male in North America. I might hope for more openness in the end, but you know Hollywood, they prefer to stay to the middle road and placate the moral majority. Praise TPTB that this show is on a cable station!
We carry from generation to generation a certain consciousness that is passed on through family. We discover that there are bigger forces at work and that there’s some divinity at work.
Keith, your feeding my dementia!
Not necessarily kidding here. Recently I have been questioning the, "bigger forces," the, "divinity at work" like it's all my delusions and my middle age crazies hanging around too long. Maybe a chemical imbalance that forces me to focus on what I often feel is a force that keeps me bound to KHC and what ever he represents.

I have asked for signs often enough, and they always say, "Stand by Your Man." I've tried to fight it true, but there comes a time in everyone's life when you can't keep up the battle and have to go with the flow.

I don't necessarily agree with, "a certain consciousness that is passed on through family." unless he means the family of human beings.

For to break it up into biological families I feel it would promote a type of elitism, that one family is different from another, where they are not IMHO. In the expression, "We are all unique, just like everyone else," one sees the homogeneousness of the being that is housed in a biological casing. All beings are energy, and this energy can transcend all manner of differences.

We all start out the same, pure, innocent energy, it is our environments with it's customs and morays that fashions us. It's our inability to see that in just being we are enlightened, in being part of, or something, some place, some race etc. we are embracing elitism, and not the happiness of just, "being."

User avatar
Karin
Posts: 271
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 5:14 pm
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Contact:

Post by Karin » Tue Aug 22, 2006 4:19 pm

D, I don't see Keith's family statement as elitist. I think that all families, through the generations have a certain feel to them. Maybe not necessarily a conciousness as in morals, etc, but a feeling of some kind. I know what he's saying, but I can't put it into words. As an example (and probably not a very good one) somebody in the family will say or do something and I'll think, "That's my grandma!" even though she passed away 5 years ago. It's a connection, a continuity. I guess values would be a part of that. Work ethic. Is this making any sense or am I off on one of my weird trains of thought again??

stealthkitty

Post by stealthkitty » Tue Aug 22, 2006 4:53 pm

D.Rabbit wrote:
I: Some feel that the Black community is pretty conservative about homosexuality. Did that factor into your decision to accept this role?

KHC: No. How things resonate within me is really the determining factor in making choices. Once you start [ letting external factors in ] , you’ve lost all control and integrity over the choices you make. Yes, the community has been slow to come along with that, for various reasons—sociologically speaking. However, no matter what you do, someone will [ question ] your choices. You have to go with what’s right with you.
I suspect Keith is not only speaking of the black community, but of his fan community as well.
There where a lot of mixed reactions when Keith made the choice to take the roll of Quincy.

I for one was not all that pleased, but I had no idea what the premise of the show was, or what the character profile was.

Since most of the reasons have come to light, I'm good with his choice of work, and proud of him too.
I should have rationalized at the start, that he would not take a job where he was just a piece of fluff to be bounced from bed to bed. (All my silliness in the Noah's Arc thread was just my having him on BTW.)

I think that as we view the character exploration of Quincy, we, those who questioned his choice, will find that Keith did the right thing by addressing the problems and dilemmas that effect the AA homosexual male in North America. I might hope for more openness in the end, but you know Hollywood, they prefer to stay to the middle road and placate the moral majority. Praise TPTB that this show is on a cable station!
We carry from generation to generation a certain consciousness that is passed on through family. We discover that there are bigger forces at work and that there’s some divinity at work.
Keith, your feeding my dementia!
Not necessarily kidding here. Recently I have been questioning the, "bigger forces," the, "divinity at work" like it's all my delusions and my middle age crazies hanging around too long. Maybe a chemical imbalance that forces me to focus on what I often feel is a force that keeps me bound to KHC and what ever he represents.

I have asked for signs often enough, and they always say, "Stand by Your Man." I've tried to fight it true, but there comes a time in everyone's life when you can't keep up the battle and have to go with the flow.

I don't necessarily agree with, "a certain consciousness that is passed on through family." unless he means the family of human beings.

For to break it up into biological families I feel it would promote a type of elitism, that one family is different from another, where they are not IMHO. In the expression, "We are all unique, just like everyone else," one sees the homogeneousness of the being that is housed in a biological casing. All beings are energy, and this energy can transcend all manner of differences.

We all start out the same, pure, innocent energy, it is our environments with it's customs and morays that fashions us. It's our inability to see that in just being we are enlightened, in being part of, or something, some place, some race etc. we are embracing elitism, and not the happiness of just, "being."
So now you are an expert on what "plagues" the homosexual AA community? Now why don't I believe that?

stealthkitty

Post by stealthkitty » Tue Aug 22, 2006 4:57 pm

D.Rabbit wrote:
I: Some feel that the Black community is pretty conservative about homosexuality. Did that factor into your decision to accept this role?

KHC: No. How things resonate within me is really the determining factor in making choices. Once you start [ letting external factors in ] , you’ve lost all control and integrity over the choices you make. Yes, the community has been slow to come along with that, for various reasons—sociologically speaking. However, no matter what you do, someone will [ question ] your choices. You have to go with what’s right with you.
I suspect Keith is not only speaking of the black community, but of his fan community as well.
There where a lot of mixed reactions when Keith made the choice to take the roll of Quincy.

I for one was not all that pleased, but I had no idea what the premise of the show was, or what the character profile was.

Since most of the reasons have come to light, I'm good with his choice of work, and proud of him too.
I should have rationalized at the start, that he would not take a job where he was just a piece of fluff to be bounced from bed to bed. (All my silliness in the Noah's Arc thread was just my having him on BTW.)

I think that as we view the character exploration of Quincy, we, those who questioned his choice, will find that Keith did the right thing by addressing the problems and dilemmas that effect the AA homosexual male in North America. I might hope for more openness in the end, but you know Hollywood, they prefer to stay to the middle road and placate the moral majority. Praise TPTB that this show is on a cable station!
We carry from generation to generation a certain consciousness that is passed on through family. We discover that there are bigger forces at work and that there’s some divinity at work.
Keith, your feeding my dementia!
Not necessarily kidding here. Recently I have been questioning the, "bigger forces," the, "divinity at work" like it's all my delusions and my middle age crazies hanging around too long. Maybe a chemical imbalance that forces me to focus on what I often feel is a force that keeps me bound to KHC and what ever he represents.

I have asked for signs often enough, and they always say, "Stand by Your Man." I've tried to fight it true, but there comes a time in everyone's life when you can't keep up the battle and have to go with the flow.

I don't necessarily agree with, "a certain consciousness that is passed on through family." unless he means the family of human beings.

For to break it up into biological families I feel it would promote a type of elitism, that one family is different from another, where they are not IMHO. In the expression, "We are all unique, just like everyone else," one sees the homogeneousness of the being that is housed in a biological casing. All beings are energy, and this energy can transcend all manner of differences.

We all start out the same, pure, innocent energy, it is our environments with it's customs and morays that fashions us. It's our inability to see that in just being we are enlightened, in being part of, or something, some place, some race etc. we are embracing elitism, and not the happiness of just, "being."
You're full of crap.

User avatar
mare_serenitatis
Site Admin
Posts: 1753
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 8:07 pm
Location: Bavaria
Contact:

Post by mare_serenitatis » Tue Aug 22, 2006 5:00 pm

That's an interesting thought, Karin. I never saw things from this angle. Thanky! :hug:

Usually, I tend to see the changes rather than the continuity.
That's why I thought that Keith took this role because it's a change. It's something totally different from what he has been playing the last years. I had the impression that his previous roles bored him a bit and that he disliked the way he got squeezed into a box and labeled by his fans and the critics. I believe that's maybe what he refered to in his statement.
War doesn't decide who is right. It only decides who is left.

User avatar
Karin
Posts: 271
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 5:14 pm
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Contact:

Post by Karin » Tue Aug 22, 2006 5:02 pm

Mare,
I agree that's one of the reasons he took the role. I wonder if he was talking of his family being involved in the community and social issues as the consciousness in his family.

User avatar
mare_serenitatis
Site Admin
Posts: 1753
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 8:07 pm
Location: Bavaria
Contact:

Post by mare_serenitatis » Tue Aug 22, 2006 5:04 pm

argh! you post faster than I can read (or post)
Spammers! :blurp2:
:mrgreen:
War doesn't decide who is right. It only decides who is left.

User avatar
Karin
Posts: 271
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 5:14 pm
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Contact:

Post by Karin » Tue Aug 22, 2006 5:05 pm

LOL! I...will...type...slower................

Sprinkle
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 5:45 pm
Location: Fantasy|USA

Post by Sprinkle » Tue Aug 22, 2006 10:19 pm

I finally got to read the interview. Interesting stuff there. I look forward to the show tommorrow evening.

User avatar
D.Rabbit
Posts: 1896
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:57 pm
Contact:

Post by D.Rabbit » Wed Aug 23, 2006 3:27 am

Karin wrote:D, I don't see Keith's family statement as elitist. I think that all families, through the generations have a certain feel to them. Maybe not necessarily a consciousness as in morals, etc, but a feeling of some kind. I know what he's saying, but I can't put it into words. As an example (and probably not a very good one) somebody in the family will say or do something and I'll think, "That's my grandma!" even though she passed away 5 years ago. It's a connection, a continuity. I guess values would be a part of that. Work ethic. Is this making any sense or am I off on one of my weird trains of thought again??
Perhaps elitism is or is not the right word for it. I saw it as not being part of the whole, and when something is no longer a part of the whole it becomes separated and in peril of becoming elitist.

I also agree with your angle on this subject. My family is so dysfunctional that I have very few reference points, but I can see your point.

My son's father was saying last year about consciousness being passed down through the DNA. All have it but very few can access it. He can and was spending the time writing it down.
However, being some what of a scientist, and a Doubting Tomas I need to see proof before I admit to this being a reality.

I don't exactly know what Keith is alluding too either, I was just taking a shot at it, because I found it fascinating.
It would be nice if he could illuminate us more on this subject in his own words.
Unconditional Love is all you need.
Image

Osiris Under Glass

User avatar
D.Rabbit
Posts: 1896
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:57 pm
Contact:

Post by D.Rabbit » Thu Aug 24, 2006 5:37 pm

What about that new picture of Keith?!!!!

It's a very odd artistic angle, you can actually view it in either landscape or portrait angle and it's still excellent. Once in hand it can almost cause a mild case of vertigo! (yes I printed it out)

I do find the foreshortening of his elegant hand a wee bit disturbing, it's almost like it's someone else's hand on his shoulder.

User avatar
Karin
Posts: 271
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 5:14 pm
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Contact:

Post by Karin » Thu Aug 24, 2006 5:46 pm

It's an excellent pic, but on Noah's Arc he has no facial hair, which makes him look really young. I prefer the hair myself, but he looks good anyway.

D, is there a software to get screen captures? Now that I download NA, I could get pics of Keith from the shows if I knew how to go about it.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest