Science Tidbits #5

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Sep 08, 2019 10:59 pm

Yeah, they came so close. I was hoping it got down on autopilot or something and they'd be able to restore communications, but that hope has faded. At least they still have the orbiter. I wonder if it, or another satellite, will be able to spot the lander like they did with the Israeli one.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Mon Sep 09, 2019 10:17 pm

Actually, I read today that they're still trying to re-establish communications, so I guess there's still some hope that it soft landed.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Mon Sep 09, 2019 10:38 pm

Yeah, space.com has an article on that.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Mon Sep 09, 2019 10:55 pm

Wow, so they did see it and it is intact. That's some good news. Although their characterization of the situation as "bleak" is not so encouraging.

I can't wait to see some pictures from the orbiter, though. That's pretty amazing resolution.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Wed Sep 11, 2019 4:48 pm

Water might have been discovered on an exo-planet! :eek:
Chances for "life as we know it" seem slim, though not impossible. But interesting this could also be a new type of planet. Whereas we have gas giants and ice giants, I suppose this one could be called a water giant.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Sep 11, 2019 11:22 pm

A Vapor Giant? It sounded pretty promising until they got around to saying how massive it is. I'd love to see it, though. What does a planet made of rainy skies look like?
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:13 pm

An article on why people should take dinasaur reconstructions with a grain of salt.
Granted things have been improving lately, but we shouldn't be certain whether the reconstructions are wholly accurate.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Sep 15, 2019 12:05 am

I think I just heard an asteroid go by. :unsure:
Lupine wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:13 pm
An article on why people should take dinasaur reconstructions with a grain of salt.
Granted things have been improving lately, but we shouldn't be certain whether the reconstructions are wholly accurate.
It's definitely impossible to know exactly what dinosaurs looked like, which is very sad. But it's also impossible to know exactly how they behaved, or what they sounded like, or what they smelled like. The extrapolations and guesses that people come up with are cool and intriguing. I love those illustrations of how contemporary animals might be reconstructed by future paleontologists. That's definitely a book worth getting.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by huggle » Mon Sep 16, 2019 4:24 pm

Reconstructing a dinosaur merely from a skeleton is difficult. However, it's not entirely impossible. Bones show how many muscles were attached to them and how strong they were. The same principle is used for facial reconstructions and phantom-images for unknown dead humans.
Fortunately, for smaller dinosaurs we often have completely fossilised specimens or at least prints of their bodies in limestone and schist.
I am sceptical towards colour reconstructions of extinct species. There are too many genetic variables to consider. Even very closely related modern species differ widely in colour. But occasionally, we are lucky =)

I've read a bit of interesting astronomical news today: apparently, an analysis of a few thousand pics of the black hole in the center of our galaxy has shown that only very recently (in April/May) it started to emit twice as much light as before which indicates that it's "feeding" more than usual. The astronomers aren't certain yet what this might mean. Some think the black hole is entering a completely new stage in its existence, others think it's only a temporary phenomenon. I blame the DS9 wormhole aliens ;)
Naah, seriousely: my theory is that it is just swallowing a big dust cloud, maybe the result of a star collision, which happens to be unusually luminous. Or it is perhaps larger than we previousely realized.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Mon Sep 16, 2019 11:13 pm

Looks like we have another Yo Mama passing through the Solar System. This one is a little different, though, as it does seem to have a cometary halo. And we don't yet know if it's oddly shaped. The other thing is, if we've seen two interstellar objects in two years, there must be a million of these things out there.
huggle wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 4:24 pm
Fortunately, for smaller dinosaurs we often have completely fossilised specimens or at least prints of their bodies in limestone and schist.
Yeah, it's amazing the detail that gets preserved in some of those fossils. But we'll just never know the reality of what they were, what colors they were, the soft anatomical parts that never get preserved, which makes me sad. There are probably whole species of animals and plants that never got fossilized, so we'll never even know that they existed.
I've read a bit of interesting astronomical news today: apparently, an analysis of a few thousand pics of the black hole in the center of our galaxy has shown that only very recently (in April/May) it started to emit twice as much light as before which indicates that it's "feeding" more than usual.
Well, that's fascinating. Maybe it's eating a globular cluster or something. At least we know it presents no danger to Earth.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Tue Sep 17, 2019 3:22 pm

huggle wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 4:24 pm
Naah, seriousely: my theory is that it is just swallowing a big dust cloud, maybe the result of a star collision, which happens to be unusually luminous. Or it is perhaps larger than we previousely realized.
I concur. That's a dense part of the galaxy so there's much to feed on there.
RJDiogenes wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 11:13 pm
Looks like we have another Yo Mama passing through the Solar System. This one is a little different, though, as it does seem to have a cometary halo. And we don't yet know if it's oddly shaped. The other thing is, if we've seen two interstellar objects in two years, there must be a million of these things out there.
It's probably more common than people have realized. We're just now capable of detecting them reliably. Now the next step will be getting samples off one.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Tue Sep 17, 2019 11:16 pm

I wonder if it's always common for these things to be flying through the Solar System, or if there was a particular event that flung a cloud of them at us.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Wed Sep 18, 2019 4:16 pm

Interesting thought. I'll have to loo to see if this comet and Yo Mama were coming from the same direction.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Sep 18, 2019 11:03 pm

That could probably even help locate more.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Wed Oct 02, 2019 3:11 pm

In another attempt to explain why Planet 9 hasn't be found yet, some have turned to black holes. :hole:
It's an interesting idea, though one we'd have no hope in proving or disproving anytime in the near future. A primordial black hole- assuming they exist- would be even harder to detect than a super-Earth.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Oct 02, 2019 11:48 pm

I'm kind of skeptical about primordial Black Holes. Why haven't they evaporated, for one thing? And if one does exist in the outer Solar System, why hasn't it accumulated more mass? And why isn't it giving off radiation from its event horizon? And why isn't it causing a big streaking effect on background stars? Why doesn't it at least have moons?
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:28 pm

^Good thought about the moons (or planets? which would a black hole have? :unsure: )

Meanwhile, Kruger 60 has now been proposed as a source for the last interstellar comet to have entered the system.
However I am skeptical about this as they place it within 5.7 light years of Kruger 60 and there are at least 6 stars closer to there as the comet would have been, making me wonder how exactly they pegged it as the source.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:45 pm

Lupine wrote:
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:28 pm
^Good thought about the moons (or planets? which would a black hole have? :unsure: )
Good question. Probably planets, since a Black Hole is a collapsed star. Except a primordial Black Hole isn't.
Meanwhile, Kruger 60 has now been proposed as a source for the last interstellar comet to have entered the system.
However I am skeptical about this as they place it within 5.7 light years of Kruger 60 and there are at least 6 stars closer to there as the comet would have been, making me wonder how exactly they pegged it as the source.
I think it has something to do with relative velocities or something....
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