Science Tidbits #6

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Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Thu Aug 06, 2020 3:47 pm

And today's secret word is blanets!
Of course when they actually discover a blanet, the IAU will declare it's not a blanet but a dwarf blanet that can't be considered a blanet.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:16 pm

^^ :lol:

It's weird, but it makes sense. Wherever you've got stuff, it's going to coalesce to some degree. It seems like a real longshot for life, but it would make a very cool setting for a sci-fi story.
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Fri Aug 14, 2020 5:03 pm

Some speculations about life on Venus.
I've speculated here before that some microbes in Venus's atmosphere could be transplants from Earth, though the mention of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere could prove a hindrance to that idea.
On a side note the aerial biosphere mentioned here is what inspired the living atmosphere of Leandra from my books.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Fri Aug 14, 2020 9:00 pm

The thing is, even if that mechanism is viable, a certain percentage of them would rain out. How would the biomass be replaced? On Earth, it's easy-- the atmosphere is full of biological material, but on Venus I think that any population that survived and evolved in the clouds would eventually disappear. But that doesn't mean that they couldn't evolve to live on the surface or under the surface, where there might be a greater range of survival options.

But, really, anything less than dinosaurs on Venus is disappointing. :(

In other news, Arecibo is broken. Seems like just equipment failure, despite the click-bait title. The thing that really amused me about the article, though, was this little bit:
In 1974, astronomers used the radio telescope to transmit a binary code toward a dense cluster of stars 25,000 light-years away, hoping the message might get picked up by another technologically-advanced civilization. (It wasn't).
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Fri Aug 14, 2020 10:19 pm

^The math is weak with that one. :lol: Or they have a crystal ball. :crystal_ball:
RJDiogenes wrote:
Fri Aug 14, 2020 9:00 pm
The thing is, even if that mechanism is viable, a certain percentage of them would rain out. How would the biomass be replaced? On Earth, it's easy-- the atmosphere is full of biological material, but on Venus I think that any population that survived and evolved in the clouds would eventually disappear. But that doesn't mean that they couldn't evolve to live on the surface or under the surface, where there might be a greater range of survival options.
Yeah, some kine of Jovian-style neutral buoyancy life would be needed.
RJDiogenes wrote:
Fri Aug 14, 2020 9:00 pm
But, really, anything less than dinosaurs on Venus is disappointing. :(
Did you ever see Planeta Bur, AKA Voyage To The Prehistoric Planet, AKA Voyage To The Planet of Prehistoric Women?

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Sat Aug 15, 2020 6:32 pm

I do not think so, and it's not on my Sea Creature Lounge list. I must track this down.
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Sun Aug 16, 2020 5:59 pm

I may end up watching ...Prehistoric Women again one of these nights as it turns out that one of my aunt's Facebook friends is in it.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Aug 16, 2020 8:37 pm

^^ That's cool. Who is it?

It's on YouTube, but pretty low-res. Amazon has a DVD and it's available as a rental on Prime. It's also for sale on Prime, but the DVD is cheaper.
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Sun Aug 16, 2020 8:45 pm

RJDiogenes wrote:
Sun Aug 16, 2020 8:37 pm
^^ That's cool. Who is it?
Mamie Van Doren

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Aug 16, 2020 11:31 pm

Oh, yes, I've certainly seen her name a few times. :yes:
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Sun Sep 13, 2020 1:41 am

Finally an answer to a question RJ has been pondering about planets and Lagrange Points.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Sep 13, 2020 9:00 pm

Haha, groovy. :D Trouble is that they'll probably be nearly impossible to detect, since neither the wobble method nor the eclipse method are likely to work.
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Sun Sep 13, 2020 9:12 pm

If the orbital plane is aligned towards us a transit should be detectable either just before or just after the B Star eclipses the A Star. Actually it should transit both stars.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Sep 13, 2020 9:39 pm

I suppose it would transit the primary, but the secondary may be so close that it drowns it out. And it would only transit the secondary when the secondary is circling around and going retrograde, which would probably be the same problem.
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Mon Sep 14, 2020 3:40 pm

The subject of life on Venus has reared its head again. :alien:

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Mon Sep 14, 2020 9:26 pm

That's pretty compelling, although I remain skeptical about cloud-based life. The really weird thing is that the Phosphine on Venus is so much more plentiful than on Earth, but equal to Jupiter and Saturn. That does make me wonder.
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by scottydog » Sat Oct 17, 2020 11:16 am

Here's an issue that can bring space exploration to a grinding halt. Let's hope something can be done, and soon.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Sat Oct 17, 2020 2:07 pm

It's been a looming threat for some time. The practice of purposely de-orbiting satellites has helped, but there's still a lot of junk up there.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Sat Oct 17, 2020 7:55 pm

It's been predicted for a while-- Clarke once wrote about the Earth developing a ring system composed of nuts and bolts in an early short story-- but now it's becoming a genuine issue. But in good entrepreneurial fashion, there are a few startups proposing solutions. My favorite, if not the best, is a giant sticky ball that works like a gigantic lint roller.
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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by scottydog » Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:04 pm

^^ That's exactly what we need. And we need it to clean up the oceans, too, although I don't know how a lint-roller in the ocean would distinguish plastics from sea life.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:10 pm

RJDiogenes wrote:
Sat Oct 17, 2020 7:55 pm
It's been predicted for a while-- Clarke once wrote about the Earth developing a ring system composed of nuts and bolts in an early short story
I used the idea in Children of Ares.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by scottydog » Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:36 pm

^Cool :yes:

What's stopping all that orbiting debris from falling to earth? Or is it falling at a VERY slow rate?

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by Lupine » Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:33 pm

Mostly they are falling back, just not very fast. Others are at a high enough orbit that it may take millennia to come back.

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Re: Science Tidbits #6

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:18 pm

scottydog wrote:
Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:04 pm
^^ That's exactly what we need. And we need it to clean up the oceans, too, although I don't know how a lint-roller in the ocean would distinguish plastics from sea life.
You'd need AI for that.
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Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:10 pm
I used the idea in Children of Ares.
It's also part of the historical backstory in Spacious Skies, although I can't remember now if I actually mentioned it.
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