Science Tidbits #5

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:35 pm

Yeah, it could be some sort of overlap or cumulative effect of adjacent branes. I've wondered in the past if gravity might have a spectrum, like electromagnetism, and maybe have different strengths at different wavelengths.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:49 pm

Now this is really cool. Some strong evidence of a moon around an exoplanet is cool enough, but this is a Neptune-sized moon of a Superjupiter. It's practically a double planet. I've often wondered about double Gas Giants (and it would be a nifty thing to use in a story) and this indicates that such a thing is indeed possible. It also proves that the bigger the planet, the bigger the moons can be, which means that large Gas Giants can indeed have habitable Earth-sized moons. And just to make all this even cooler, this planet and moon are in the Goldilocks Zone. Now the next question is whether the giant moons can have moons of their own. :D

In other interesting news, there's a Goblin in the outer Solar System that provides more evidence for a massive Planet X.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:54 pm

RJDiogenes wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:49 pm
Now this is really cool. Some strong evidence of a moon around an exoplanet is cool enough, but this is a Neptune-sized moon of a Superjupiter. It's practically a double planet. I've often wondered about double Gas Giants (and it would be a nifty thing to use in a story) and this indicates that such a thing is indeed possible. It also proves that the bigger the planet, the bigger the moons can be, which means that large Gas Giants can indeed have habitable Earth-sized moons. And just to make all this even cooler, this planet and moon are in the Goldilocks Zone. Now the next question is whether the giant moons can have moons of their own. :D
I saw this yesterday. Ironically I had been thinking about Super-Jupiters having Neptune-sized moons after our previous discussion about moons here. I imagine that with further discoveries like this there will eventually be a debate on just what qualities as a Moon and what is a double-planet.
RJDiogenes wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:49 pm

In other interesting news, there's a Goblin in the outer Solar System that provides more evidence for a massive Planet X.
It would be nice if they could find it soon, but as it was pointed out this world would be very far out and hard to see.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Thu Oct 04, 2018 9:38 pm

Lupine wrote:
Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:54 pm
I imagine that with further discoveries like this there will eventually be a debate on just what qualities as a Moon and what is a double-planet.
And the IAU will come up with some nonsensical definition. Some people already consider the Moon-Earth and Pluto-Charon systems to be double planets. Personally, I think one body can't be any less than 50% of the mass of the other to be considered double.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Thu Oct 04, 2018 9:55 pm

I'd go by barycenter and whether it's within the larger of the two bodies. But the IAU will probably come up with some tortured definition that will insisted that a moon can't be a moon even if they call it a moon.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:24 pm

Lupine wrote:
Thu Oct 04, 2018 9:55 pm
I'd go by barycenter and whether it's within the larger of the two bodies.
That would make the double planet designation dependent on the distance between the bodies, which is dynamic. The barycenter of the Earth-Moon system is a bit under the surface of Earth now, but the Moon is slowly inching away, which means we could become a double planet in the future even though we aren't now. The ratio of size or mass would be a constant (although what the threshold should be is certainly up for debate).
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:55 pm

^Good thought on the barycenter shifting over time. I'll have to look that up.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:18 pm

Whoo! An astronaut and a cosmonaut had to make an emergency landing when their spacecraft malfunctioned. As far as we know, they are both okay, thank goodness.

In less happy news, a Neanderthal kid was eaten by a giant bird. :mellow:
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:56 pm

^Wow! :eek: (on both counts).

Glad the astronauts and cosmonauts are OK.

My guess that the bird in question was a vulture. I don't know of any large birds of prey in Europe at that time and few would probably try to take on a human, even a young one.
But it also brings up an interesting question: was the child abandoned in the wild for some reason or was he/she ceremonially fed to the vulture(s), ala Sky Burial?

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by scottydog » Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:30 pm

^^ Good question. I suspect an accident but wouldn't it be interesting if this were some sort of ritual?

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sat Oct 13, 2018 2:58 pm

^It's possible as Neanderthals most likely had some kind of spiritual life. Nothing is certain obviously but it's not something that should be dismissed.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:23 pm

I assumed it was one of those giant terror birds of the distant past, but I guess not. In that case, the kid probably died from other reasons and was scavenged. A ritual brings up interesting story ideas, though.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Orpheus » Sat Oct 13, 2018 10:57 pm

It's been a running joke in anthropology. longer than I've been alive, that any unknown object will eventually be ascribed a ritual/religious function (until its true function is identified). To be fair, I think that was much more common in the 19th/early 20th century and decreased over my lifetime.

Wait? Does that mean that if they ever stop, I will die? Am I just a metaphysical gas gauge?

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:28 pm

You're like one of the characters in American Gods. Orpheus, the God of Unknown Rituals. :messiah:
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:23 pm

An interesting article on how Mercury might have formed with three scenarios covering various impact hypothesizes.
Personally I've been kicking around the idea that the impactor that formed our Moon might have in fact been Mercury. It's possible that in the distant past Earth and Mercury shared a similar orbit and eventually they had a glancing blow that formed the Moon and stripped Mercury of it's crust.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:23 pm

Mercury formed in the outer Solar System, collided with Uranus and knocked it on its side, plowed through Saturn's moons, created the rings, then crashed into Earth, forming the Moon, before finally settling into its cozy orbit next to the sun. :lol:

I wonder if it's possible to calculate what the mass and diameter of Mercury would be if it weren't stripped of most of its crust. Would it be the size of Earth or Mars? Or might it be a Gas Giant? Maybe Mercury is what's left over when you put a Gas Giant next to the sun and its atmosphere vaporizes.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Wed Oct 24, 2018 2:58 pm

^It's hard to tell. I Googled around for comparisons of the cores of the inner planets and got some contradictory results. But I think had Mercury retained its crust it probably would have been terrestrial.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Oct 24, 2018 10:38 pm

Definitely possible that Mercury was Orpheus then-- not our Orpheus, of course, but the body that collided with Earth to create the Moon.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Thu Oct 25, 2018 3:22 pm

I don't know. Just what is Orpheus's overall mass and where was he 4 billion years ago? :unsure:

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:33 pm

Apparently about the same as Mars. But, according to the Wiki page, Orpheus (or Theia) actually merged with Earth, so there is no leftover body.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Tue Nov 06, 2018 11:03 pm

Well, maybe Oumuamua is really an alien space probe after all. :unsure: :lol:
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Tue Nov 06, 2018 11:34 pm

^I saw an article on that earlier. While I still think Oumuamua could possibly be a derelict, the reasoning here is a bit of a stretch.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Nov 07, 2018 1:02 am

Well, when you think of what the odds are of us looking at exactly the right spot to see a random alien ship pass through the system it doesn't seem likely. Unless a hundred alien derelicts pass through the system every year. :lol:
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:37 pm

^We live in a junkyard. :lol:

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:14 pm

We're like the old Quincy Quarries: Teenage aliens dump their old wrecks here. :lol:
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