Science Tidbits #5

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sat Jan 18, 2020 9:43 pm

Now it works. huggle fixed it. It's like Schrodinger's Cat-- its status depends on who observes it. :lol:
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Gary » Sun Jan 19, 2020 3:40 pm

I watched the Space-X test of the escape sequence for the Dragon capsule this morning. It was absolutely fantastic to watch and impressive to see everything work as expected. Hearing the cheers from those in the command center was reassuring as all involved have a lot to be proud of accomplishing.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sun Jan 19, 2020 3:57 pm

^They're making good progress.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sun Jan 19, 2020 8:06 pm

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:53 pm

Animated Gary Larson. Nice! :lol:

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sat Jan 25, 2020 3:58 pm

Had a 4.6 earthquake here last night. I'm posting it here as it apparently occurred on an unmapped fault.
It did feel a little unusual at my place. I heard it before I felt anything. When I did feel it it was little more than a quiver followed by a short, sharp jolt.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sat Jan 25, 2020 7:52 pm

Wow, an unmapped fault. That's interesting and scary. What did it sound like?
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sat Jan 25, 2020 7:54 pm

Kind of a low rumbling.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Sun Jan 26, 2020 9:13 pm

Must have been ominous and alarming.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sun Jan 26, 2020 10:57 pm

More like "whats that?". Living under the air-path for airliners and between military bases, rumbings of various sorts aren't uncommon here.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:52 pm

Oh, yeah, I remember when South Weymouth NAS was open when I was a kid. We had a lot of rumbling. And shrieking.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:54 pm

It was worse here before George Air Force Base was closed. Back then the valley was covered by radar so the F-4s would dive in for some hot-dogging. There was even a cargo plane that dipped so low that it clipped the tops of our neighbor's trees.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Tue Jan 28, 2020 11:37 pm

Whoa. Good thing nobody had a treehouse.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by scottydog » Thu Feb 13, 2020 3:42 am

RJDiogenes wrote:
Sat Jan 25, 2020 7:52 pm
Wow, an unmapped fault. That's interesting and scary. What did it sound like?
Lupine wrote:
Sat Jan 25, 2020 7:54 pm
Kind of a low rumbling.
It is kind of amazing how many times an earthquake reveals an unknown fault.

My experience with hundreds of quakes is that they're like snowflakes -- no two shakings are alike.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by huggle » Thu Feb 13, 2020 3:58 pm

that's a good comparism. But the infrasound bang that we feel before we hear anything or before the ground starts to shake appears to be something they all have in common, like all snowflakes being hexagonal.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by scottydog » Sun Mar 29, 2020 2:14 am

huggle wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 3:58 pm
that's a good comparism. But the infrasound bang that we feel before we hear anything or before the ground starts to shake appears to be something they all have in common, like all snowflakes being hexagonal.
Wow, you really know your snowflakes, huggle! What was your major in college?

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by huggle » Mon Mar 30, 2020 4:18 pm

I had two: Biology and English. And as German rules require 2 further minor subjects I added Social Sciences and Latin.

But physics, and particularly the area where biology and physics overlap, has always fascinated me. Hence the faible for snowflakes. It's such a good example for nature always trying out every single possibility and variation one basic model or principle offers. In case of snowflakes it's the angle between the Hydrogen and the two Oxigens that forces them to be hexagonal. But nevertheless everyone is unique. Just like people.
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Wed Apr 15, 2020 9:49 pm

And we have another planet being billed as Earth 2.
Just a few years ago this would have been a major headline. Now it barely makes a blip. That's how mundane these type of discoveries are becoming. But if life really is common throughout the universe, we're now looking at worlds that have life on them. :alien:

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Apr 15, 2020 10:35 pm

The artist of the artist's conception seems a little pessimistic. :lol:

I can't wait till the next generation of telescopes gets up there to do some follow up research. I want to see some spectroscopy! :D
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Fri Apr 17, 2020 11:43 pm

A date has been set for the first manned SpaceX mission to the ISS: May 27th.

This also happens to be the date of the 7th season premiere of SHIELD. Coincidence? I think SO!
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:20 pm

^ :lol:

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Orpheus » Wed Apr 22, 2020 1:21 am

"Reality" shows are cheaper to produce than scripted drama. I guess that was the compromise that got them one final season.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Wed Apr 22, 2020 3:43 pm

Looks like a lot of super-Earth's might be water worlds.
However as the article points out, these worlds wouldn't be quite like one would imagine them to be. They'd be rather like little wet Jupiters.

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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by RJDiogenes » Wed Apr 22, 2020 10:13 pm

So we may be what we are not because we're so wet, but because we're so dry. Half the mass of a super-Earth is a lot of water-- a mini-Neptune would definitely be a better term, because, y'know, Neptune. I'm trying to imagine what a gas giant with water instead of gas would be like. The physics and the appearance. That would be pretty wild.

I wonder what the percentage of planets with masses of 1.5 and below are.
Orpheus wrote:
Wed Apr 22, 2020 1:21 am
"Reality" shows are cheaper to produce than scripted drama. I guess that was the compromise that got them one final season.
Wait, are we still talking about SHIELD? :lol:
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Re: Science Tidbits #5

Post by Lupine » Wed Apr 22, 2020 10:33 pm

RJDiogenes wrote:
Wed Apr 22, 2020 10:13 pm
I wonder what the percentage of planets with masses of 1.5 and below are.
This is the most recent graph I could find.

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